Impacting Customers Every Chance You Get

Published On: March 5, 2017By Categories: Editor's Note, Editor’s Note

We’re all salespeople, and that’s something we have to be conscious of at all times because we never know when we’re going to have the opportunity to impact a customer.

I thought about that recently when I was a customer. I volunteered to pick up books I had printed instead of having them mailed to my office. The vendor was only 70 miles from me, so I decided to save a few bucks on shipping.

I had never met anyone at the vendor. I had talked to different people on the phone, was impressed with samples of the work they had provided, and decided to go with them.

When I volunteered to pick up the books, I thought I would hear, “Oh my gosh, it will be great to finally meet you.”

I didn’t. I was simply asked what day and time worked for the pickup. When I responded, I figured then I would then get the “Oh my gosh, it will be great to finally meet you.”

I didn’t. I was simply told to head to Door 10. When I asked the person I had worked with for weeks on the project that had a nice price tag if she would be there, I figured that’s when I’d hear, “Oh my gosh, it will be great to finally meet you.”

I didn’t. And that’s a shame.

You need to take every opportunity you get to grow your relationships with customers.

The person had a chance to sell to me even more. She could have shown me other types of projects her company handles. She could have introduced me to the staff that worked on my book. She could have shown me the machinery that handled my project. Heck, she could have been the first to show me the book we worked on together. After all, I had mentioned several times I was excited to see it.

But she didn’t. I signed a receiving slip, put the books in my trunk, and headed 70 miles down the road.

You’re not told when you have a chance to make an impact. That’s why you need to take every opportunity you get to grow your relationships with customers, the long-time ones, and most importantly, the new ones.

People buy from those they are comfortable with. People love to interact, work with—and buy—from friends. Do many of your relationships with customers feel like friendships?

I still haven’t met anyone at the book vendor. That doesn’t mean I won’t call them the next time I have a project. I might; the book turned out great.

But I bet I wouldn’t consider anyone else if I felt like I had a friend at the company.


Thad PlumleyThad Plumley is the editor of WWJ and director of information products at the National Ground Water Association. He can be reached at tplumley@ngwa.org and on Twitter @WaterWellJournl.

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